“Keep Calm & Carry On”

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Why is my phone so smart, when I’m so dumb!

It’s all in our attitudes.

I’m using the collective noun because we all do it. PANIC. And, no one panics better than older persons facing a problem using their computer and other devices, especially their smart phone.  I’ve had decades of experience using a computer and being on the internet. Yet, there are many times when….yes…I do PANIC.

There are plenty of other situations in which I PANIC.

Such as, last fall, I went into a PANIC when I hosted with delight my granddaughter, cooked a holiday dinner, welcomed the rest of the family, while readying my stored winter clothes, paying the bills, getting my medications in preparation to packing  for my annual month-long trip to the cold North.   Then I saw this printed on my kitchen sponge.

IT WORKS. (I only forgot my toothbrush!)

Since then, I’ve developed a new mantra, new to me, but old to history.  Keeping calm and carrying on makes life easier especially  with your computers, tablets and smart phones, You may not feel that you have control of your devices but you do have control of your attitude.

 

 

 

 

Don’t Punch Your Smartphone

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I’m back.  Glad you missed me.

Here is how to get your smart phone to work “in a grand fashion”.

So many friends are now getting smart phones usually because their old phones have finally died.

At first, they are delighted to exhibit that they, too, own a new up-to-date, with-it instrument so loved by their grandchildren. Look at all the things it can do!

Except, despite getting all kinds of help from younger family, friends and even paid professionals, my friends cannot use it as a phone. Or, for that matter, they cannot use it at all.

I keep watching them very quickly jab their smart phone with one finger as if they were still dialing an old, dumb phone.  it doesn’t work that way any more.

 WRONG

A smart phone has a touch screen just like your tablet and possibly your new computer. This works by placing—-not punching—-your finger on the number or button that you want to work.  The new phones don’t react to the pressure of your tap, jab or punch—- but rather—- to the electrical conductivity of your finger.

Just remember to hold your finger gently and slowly on the number or “button” you want to work. When it responses, then go on to the next action you want to perform.

Don’t punch. Caress your smart phone.

Best Web Articles

 (Right click and open in a new tab.)

When I Tap on My iPad or iPhone, I Get More Frustration Than Results!  by Martin Kadansky  at kadansky.com  Good suggestions on how to increase your conductivity and making it easier to use.

How to Set Up a Smartphone for Someone Who’s Never Used One by Melanie Pinola at lifehacker.com

Do You Really Need A Smartphone? by Janice Brown at senioritycomplex.com

E-Reading from Amazon without a Kindle

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The other day, at my book club, we were talking about the problems of getting books when the weather gets bad or when we get sick for longer periods of time.  Hard to get out to the book store or the library.   Plus,  we’ve heard that many neighborhood book stores have closed.  Friends living around the globe are reporting that it is getting harder and harder to find a good selection of English books.

Next, of course, the conversation moved to the dilemma of the ebook being one of the causes and yet a solution for the situation.

Several of our members do have a Kindle. (We love our Kindle Paperwhites.)   And, are enjoying the ease of buying books from Amazon….and of reading digitally.

However, other members, who already have iPhones and iPads or Samsung phones and tablets, just do not want to buy another device.  On the other hand, they see the advantage of being able to buy ebooks from Amazon, too.

No problem.

Amazon has reading apps, free-of-charge.

There are apps for the Amazon Cloud Reader, smart phones (iPhone, iPod touch, Android …. that’s Samsung and many others, Windows and Blackberry), computers (Mac, Windows 8 and Windows 7, XP and Vista) and tablets (iPad, Android and Windows 8).

How to Download a Kindle Reading App.

1. Use the device to which you want to download the Kindle Reading App.  That means, if you want to put the app on your iPad, use your iPad to go to Amazon.  This is the absolutely most important thing to know.  How do I know—-because I tried to download a Kindle reading app for iPad by using my PC.  Doesn’t work.

2. Go to amazon.com

3. Under “Shop by Department“, put your cursor on Kindle E-readers and Books. 

4. See where it says Apps and Resources.

5. Right under this, click on Free Kindle Reader Apps.

6.  There you are.  Now click on the app that you need and follow the directions.

7. Be sure to read all of the wonderful things that you can do using the free Kindle Reading apps.

Syncing

With a Kindle reading app on all your devices, you can synchronize your reading….as long as the WiFi is on when you finish reading.  It’s like having the same book on the coffee table where my iPad is, and in my purse where I have my iPhone and by my bed where I keep my Kindle.  I never have to remember my place.  Amazon does that for me!!!

 

 

Passion for Cooking Sites

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Next to figuring out marketing problems, I love to cook…or at least read cooking sites. So many of you also have this passion.  Cooking website and blogs are among the most popular sites on the Web.

The other day I was “benching”.  I love this word.  It means sitting on a bench resting while walking around town on errands.

 A friend joined me.  She is compiling individual cookbooks as gifts for her kids and grandkids.  She is using her own recipes plus finding new ones from the Web.  Now, how is that for exploring the Internet in a grand fashion!

I use cooking sites just as I use cookbooks on paper … for enjoyment and to get ideas.  And, especially, to follow the method by which a dish is prepared.  I rarely follow a recipe exactly…do you?

The Internet has thousands of cooking sites. They take many different formats. Here are a few of my best sources.

To get more information, put your mouse over the red area before the word (click), then right-click and open in a new tab.

or

If you are on a touch tablet or phone, just tap on the red area before the word (click).

Traditional Websites

Allrecipes.com (click)

Allrecipes.com (click) has grown into the world’s largest global social network food website since its beginning in 1997. These recipes are usually practical and easy to make. I actually cook from them.

The website now has versions for 19 different countries in that country’s language. Fortunately for English readers, the exception is  India and SW Asia, which is in English probably because these countries have many languages.  If you  become a free member, you can develop your own Recipe Box, create your shopping list and receive a number of newsletters of your choice.

Cooking with your kids and grandkids. There is a whole collection of  kid friendly recipes and procedures. On the website, click on search and type in kid friendly.

This site has lots of cooking videos, too.  I like the ones from Chef John of Food Wishes that is part of this network. He also is on YouTube.

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 This is going into my box to share with my kids.

F&W: The Dish

F&W: The Dish is the newsletter sent out several times a week by the website of the popular Food & Wine (Click) magazine. Of the many cooking newsletter, The Dish does the best job of organizing recipes by chefs into categories, presented in a slide shows with lovely pictures, brief descriptions of the dish and  easy-to-follow recipes.

Yesterday, The Dish featured Healthy Thai Food Triumphs. Here is an example.  I’m having this for lunch soon.

“Joanne Chang prepares this salad when she’s craving Chinese food but wants something light and easy. She sometimes makes it even crunchier by adding Napa cabbage, cucumbers and carrots.”  Recipe. (Click)

To subscribe, without charge, go to www.foodandwine.com (click). Look for this down a bit from the top on the right side.

At the site, click “sign up” and enter your email address.

Substitutions: As with so many food sites, finding some of the ingredients can be a problem. However, you can use the Internet to search for a substitute.  For example, for lemongrass put into your search engine: lemongrass substitute.

Joy of Baking (Click)

My favorite baking site is Joy of Baking.  (Click) Founded by Stephanie Jaworski in 1997, the site has so many recipes, many with videos, that are devised and tested by Jaworski in her own kitchen.  Each recipe includes the history of the item.    A bonus is the sections on substitutions, ingredients, glossary, conversions, weight vs volume and an extensive bibliography.

Here is “my” Pavlova recipe.

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Newspaper Food Archives

Seems like every newspaper has a food section.  You can find the food section from your favorite newspaper by doing a search. For example, new york times food 

Here are two of my favorites.

The Guardian has a section that includes 159 recipes and growing by Yotam Ottoelenghi, (Click) award-winning, Israeli-born chef, writer and owner of popular restaurants in London. 

Los Angeles Times

I find that one of the biggest problems with Internet recipes is the lack of adequate professional testing.  Not with the Los Angeles Times.  (Click) The paper has its own Test Kitchen. They claim that they test over 600 recipes a year but only 400 make it into print.


Food Blogs

A food blog is very personally focused on the author’s own activities and interests.  There are thousands and more everyday.  Many now feature healthy eating. Some of them are excellent; however, beware, I have had more failures from this category of Internet food sites.

Here are three of my favorite award-winning sites that I enjoy. I receive newsletters from all of them.

Smitten Kitchen:  Deb Perelman makes magic in her 42 square foot , 1935 style half-galley kitchen with a single counter and a tiny stove. Creative cook and photographer, Deb writes about feeding her family  and friends.  Be sure to look at the comments. She has an army of followers who offer good comments on her presented recipes.

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David Lebovitz: David Lebovitz “lives the sweet life in Paris”. This award-winning USA pastry chef  and author moved to Paris in 2002.  His blog is a culinary guide, with recipes, to this city and other areas that he visits. He also gives good advice about touring in each city.  I even cook from some of the recipes, but mostly I enjoy the photos and adventures.

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Simply Recipes:  This blog is just what it says …. simple, cookable home-style family recipes. It repeatedly wins the best food blog awards. Elise Bauer, a Californian living near Sacramento, began her site from her family’s recipe box. Now she develops her own recipes. If a recipe comes from another source, she tests it and acknowledges the author. “We believe in a varied, healthy diet, using real butter, real cream, eggs, lots of green vegetables, and protein from meat, fish, beans, and cheese.”

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What is your favorite cooking site?

Let us know in the comment box below.

Learning about Online Learning

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For those of us living in the Northern Hemisphere, isn’t this weather terrible.

It may look beautiful from inside your warm home; however, it really discourages going out  routinely for classes and lectures.

No need to let you brain veg out.  The Internet offers you 1000s of courses and lectures.  The biggest problem is choosing one.

Let’s go search the web in a grand fashion.

Remember if you want to go to a mentioned site, run your mouse over the name.  If a red underline appears, click and open in a new tab.

iTunes/iTunes U

iTunes/iTunes U heralds itself as the world’s largest online catalog of free education content.  They claim that they have access to more than more than 500,000 free lectures, videos, books and other resources on what appears to be an endless variety of subjects.   Hundreds of college and universities including StanfordYaleOxford, and The Open University, and distinguished institutions such as MoMA, the New York Public Library, and the Royal Opera House.

Right now I’m studying  on my iPad…….

“Jerusalem: The Holy City” Lecturer. Dr. Robert Cargill at UCLA

“Science and Cooking” Harvard. Harvard Researchers and World Class Chefs

You don’t have to have an iPad to learn from iTuneU.  You can use it on your Windows computer and other devices using an Android operation system.

The downloading of an iTuneU app is required. To find the appropriate app search: 

iTunes u app for …..

Fill in whichever is your operating system: mac, android or windows.

YouTubeEDu

YouTube has much more than videos that go viral.  Its education content includes 1000s  of high quality videos for students from tots to our age. For us, there are videos of everything from academic lectures including top universities from around the world to speeches by individuals who are “global thought leaders”.

Being a geek, I had lots of mathematics courses but nothing about the history of mathematics.  Right now, I’m “going” to Gersham College in London, founded in 1597, to “Shaping Modern Mathematics: The 19th Century”.

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On the other end of the spectrum are the short, entertaining lectures about an almost unending number of topics such as science, technology, psychology and even gaming. This popular channel, called Vsauce, is created by Internet personality Michael Stevens.  

Here is one of my favorites.

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Other Learning Sites

In its grand fashion, the Internet is rich with learning opportunities.  Here are some more sources.

BBC Learning   The BBC offer learning on most any topic you choose.  They not only offer information from their own organization but also provide links to other online courses.  The quality is superb.  For example, take a look at its leaning languages, quickly.

Ted Talks  “Riveting talks by remarkable people, free to the world” Over 1400 relatively short videos from some of the most engaging speakers around the world on an endless variety topics, especially technology, entertainment and design (TED). You are urged to share these talks with your friends.  Here is one of my favorites: “Colin Powell: Kids need structure”.

 
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So if you are suffering from a lingering head cold —- as I am and so many of my friends are — forget that  it is frigid and icy outside and you are bored.  Snuggle up with your iPad and watch a lecture of your choice.

What online courses and lectures have you enjoyed?  Just let us know in this comment box.

In love with the fashion, finally, again.

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When I first starting writing this blog about a year and a half ago, I emoted  about how really weird fashion had become for both men and women.  Then, about a year ago, I remarked that fashion was making progress by moving away from the absurd.

I’m delight to announce that I’m in love with the current fashion for the whole family, finally, again.

Women

And, why not?  Look at these clean, classical lines of this trench-coat shown recently in the New York Times.

Red Leather Trench-coat. Right out of my 1960s closet.

Remember, if you want to go to one of the sites that are in red, just put your cursor over the red, click and open a new tab.

Men

My favorite men’s fashion blog, Grey Fox, recently featured the Best of Britain 2014 fashion. Here, he looks at Marks and Spencer collection. These styles are appropriate for men of all ages. Look at those wingtip shoes.

M&S. 2014

And, Even Children

Dashin Fashion, the online designer kids fashion news magazine, is featuring the return to style in children’s fashion. You can shop for these fashions from the site.

What could be more classical than this tuxedo-styled romper  and “that little black dress with pearls” (painted on, of course).

The Tiny Universe. 2013 Holiday Party Wear.

Dashin Fashion reports that designers, like Oscar de la Renta, are creating styles for Mommy and Daughter, which they call “Mini Me”.

For Mom, remember the shirtwaist dress with a wide belt.  Here it is again….with such style.

Oscar de la Renta. Fall 2013

And now for the mini.  I cannot remember what this style is called except that my daughter had a dress with the same lines.  It was pink with a white Peter Pan collar.  Notice that the fabric is just like one of the panels of Mom’s dress.

Oscar de la Renta. Fall 2013

Think. Don’t Panic over Your Electronics.

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My friends may believe that I’m knowledgeable of my various electronic gadgets, such as my mobile phone. But, every time something goes wrong, I PANIC.

I wouldn’t bother you with this story if I hadn’t PANICKED two other times over my mobile phone not working and dashed off to the tech office without thinking.

Well, more than twice.

This time, I had my phone on the charger. For some reason, I could not call out nor could a receive incoming calls. From my land-line phone, I telephoned the help desk of my mobile provider service.

Isn’t this neat! The ‘voice’ said, “Just hit #1 and we will call me back within ten minutes.”  Only, after thirty minutes, I got tired of waiting.

I should be able to figure this out.

In the past, the problem often was a loose SIM card.   I opened the back. Yes. Reconnected the SIM card.  Suddenly, the battery fell out.  PANIC. I  put it back in.

The phone was black. I went through the two steps to turn it on that I do so many times a day.  – then *   Black.  Still black, regardless of what I click on.

PANIC.   The problem must be the battery, right.

Just then, the land phone rang.  Finally, the help service.  They agreed it had to be the battery…just as I had told them was wrong.  I must go to the technical help office.

How can I go out without a working mobile phone.  (Forgetting that most of my life I managed without a mobile phone.) Even more PANIC.

I didn’t wait to think.

Instead, in my panic, I rushed to the shopping mall office. Waited and waited.  Finally, my turn.  I hope I don’t have to buy a new phone.

The tech opened the back of the phone. SIM card, right. Battery, right.

No problem.

I had NOT  turned on the phone’s power button to connect to my telephone service.

I forgot that almost all of the time my mobile phone power is on.  When I use the phone all I do is wake it up(- then *)  When I removed the battery, I disconnected the power.  Of course!!!!

I hope I  learned my lesson.  

I need to read the instructions especially when I am having a problem.   Most mobile phone instructions are on the Internet.

Read and Understand the instructions.

I need to look for this sign on the phone, often in red and very small, too. And remember to hold it down rather than just touch it.

Power Button Sign

I need to remember that on some of my electronic gadgets the power button is hidden on the side with no symbol identifying it.

I need to vow to Think before Panicking.

Life on an iPad: Emails

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I just got back from my annual migration to the other half of my family on the other side of the world.  Being computer and internet addicted, I was faced with making a choice of the best device to use for those five weeks.

My iPad won.

Beloved Toy

Normally, my iPad resides on my coffee table, posed to answer such pressing questions……as……What other films has the actor, in the film I’m currently viewing on TV, been in?  Or, tucked in bed with me, while I attend iTunes U with a series of lectures from UCLA on “Jerusalem:  The Holy City”.

(Want to know more about iTunes U. Move your mouse to the blue  iTunes U.   Right click and open in a new tab.)

Why did I choose an iPad instead of a laptop or a smart phone?

First of all, I may be old-fashioned, but I just don’t like using a laptop computer.  They are too heavy for me to tote around, especially while traveling.  When using one, I get a neck and back ache because my posture is all wrong for me.  Plus, even when using a mouse, I find that my laptop does all kinds of strange things.

Next confession.  When I’m out of the country, I use an old dumb phone….as opposed to a smart phone.  This means that I cannot use my phone to get my emails or surf the web.

Instead, I chose my iPad especially for emailing.

Gmail on the iPad

I use Gmail for PC.  However, I found that using the iPad original mail function, set for Gmail, is limited as compared to the Gmail program on my PC.

(If you use another email provider on both your PC and iPad and that provider has an iPad app, then the problem and the process for improving emailing on you iPad are the same as what I’m going to describe.)

Free Gmail App is Better

I discovered that Gmail has a free app for iPad that is more nearly complete.

Gmail for iPad app

To download Gmail for iPad, go to the App Store.

Tap on Featured at the left bottom of the screen.

Type in gmail in the search box at the upper right.

The Gmail app will be the first on the left.

Click on FREE, the INSTALL APP  and put in your password.

 After the app is installed (there is a moving bar at the bottom of the logo), click on OPEN.

I found that this version of Gmail is still not as complete as my PC version. For example, there are no calendar and contacts functions, but you can get into your “labels”. (I still call them folders.) Nevertheless, for general use, away from my PC, it is good enough.

Change Mail Setting on iPad

I discovered that email management was much easier if I changed my mail setting on my iPad. Instead of my Gmail account, I substituted my Yahoo account that I maintain as a secondary source for my email. This way all of the interconnected programs, like emailing a photo taken on my iPad, still function.

Click on this.

Click on Mail, Contacts, Calendar.

Now under Accounts….click on Mail. (under iCloud) Delete you Gmail account.

Next, add your alternative email account by tapping Add Account and selecting the appropriate email provider.

Opening an alternative account is really easy.  Just remember to use a different password for each account. 

Changing Countries in the App Store

I discovered that, in some cases, different countries have a different iPad (Apple) app store, which means that you must set your iPad  to that country.

Don’t worry Apple will be sure to let you know when you must to change stores.

Go to Settings and scroll down to iTunes & App Stores.

Tap on Apple ID. Tap on Country/Region.

Enter your new location.

Grand Travel Sanity Suggestion

Nothing, but nothing, can make me go nuts faster than, after all that packing and planning, arriving at my destination and finding that I cannot access my email addresses and telephone number and that I forgot my passwords.

I know there are ways of putting them in your SafeWallet, DropBox or even floating up there on an iCloud.  Personally, I  print out

          • All my contacts’ telephone numbers regardless of where they live
          • The email addresses of frequently visited sites.
          • My most important passwords.

I make two copies and put them in my carry-on and my suit case.

Low tech…..yes.  But, it always works…..as long as you remember where you put those copies.

And, don’t forget to pack the charger and an electrical plug adapter, if needed.

iPads Have Limitations.

I found the most apparent reality using an iPad is that it  is not a full size computer. It has its virtues, but I learned not to expect it to function the same way.

In many cases, apps are not as functional or as easy to understand how to use as the original internet site.  Remember you can get to the original site while you are still on your iPad by using a search engine.  I prefer to use Google, which I downloaded  as an iPad app.

Children’s Clothing for the Next Generation

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My grandkids love to wear hand-me-downs, not just from their older sibs but most of all from their parents….and even their grandparents. Wearing garments from past generations is popular. They are called heritage or vintage clothes.

When I saw it on her daughter…my granddaughter,  I was so glad that I saved a dress that my once four-year-old daughter loved to wear often.

My ten-year-old granddaughter looks adorable in her seventeen-year-old sister’s summer dress, which was worn at the same age.

Specially loved and beautifully designed clothing for children of all ages…not merely for newborns and babies….can be enjoyed for generations.  

What Not to Save?

You just cannot save everything so you really must be selective.

No matter who the designer, a shirt that was itchy-scratchy on your son won’t necessarily be any more comfortable on his son.

A very expensive dress, which never  was worn because your daughter hated it, doesn’t mean that she will like it any better on her own daughter.

Clothing, so dearly loved and so often worn that you can almost see through the fabric, may be cherished but are not good candidates for surviving another generation.

What to Save?

The clothing you decide to preserve must be liked by the child, comfortable to wear and in good condition. However, it also should have a special meaning for saving…..not just that it was worn at a memorable event.  Even more important, the original wearer liked this item most of alloften for the simplest reason…… “I felt strong when I wore it.”   or   “It made a beautiful noise when I walked.” or “I always had fun when I wore it.”

Preserving the Reason for Saving.    Along with saving the clothing item make up a packet explaining why you are preserving it.  A picture  of the child wearing the item is wonderful to include.  You can be creative technically  with voice and video messages.  However, also include the information on paper.  Technology does change over the years and you might not be able to play back that video a generation from now.  Look what happened to the wire-recorder of my teens.

If you want the clothing to survive in a wearable condition for future generations, the secret is in the preservation.

I learned from the web that, if you want to save the items for more than a couple of years, you cannot just give them a washing, zip  into a plastic storage bag, shove into the attic and hope for the best.

Steps to Successful Preservation

Take a good look at the clothing.  Identify any stains.  Make any repairs now.  After the item is cleaned, you should handle it as little as possible so that the oils from you hands don’t get on the clothing.

Either launder or dry clean the clothing.  Be sure to treat the stains properly. The item must be throughly dried.  If dry cleaned, remove from the plastic bag and air out any lingering fumes.

Use special archival acid free tissue paper to protect the fabric and to support details such as puff sleeves and pleats.

Remove metal buttons and details such as buckles that can rust and spoil permanently the garment.  Wrap in tissue and store with the clothing.

Put the item in either archival boxes or  plastic storage boxes made of cast polypropylene (PP).

Include any special accessories worn with the clothes, your packet explaining why you saved it and even a sprig of lavender.

Store in a dry area such as under a bed or in a closet that is not near water pipes. Basement and attic areas are not recommended.

For more details, I think that the best website for learning how to preserve children’s clothing so that they can be passed to the next generation in good condition is on the mega website about.com.

  laundry.about.com/od/storage/ht/storebabyclothe.htm

(Remember to click on this address and open in a new tab.)

Honey Ice Cream Cake

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The title of this post could really be “How to Use the Internet When You are  Too Stingy and Lazy to Throw It Out”. But, that is too long.

Eventually, you will get to my original recipe for Honey Ice Cream Cake that you also can  use as a method for making your own original ice cream cakes.

This Saga Begins

As an aging multitasker, I think that I can still do many things and have everything come out well.  Like—-following up on my emails, cleaning the desk and baking a cake for company!

I had found online an awesome recipe for honey bourbon cake. The recipe said to bake in the middle of the oven, so I changed the rack from a lower position.  I  noticed that soon I had to charge my iPad on which I was following the recipe thus I forget that in my oven things burned when place in the middle position.

Made the cake, popped it in the oven and returned to my office. After a while, I wondered what my neighbor is burning now. 

Wait!!!! That is my cake……my aging multitasking brain finally kicked in.

Running, as best I can run, to the kitchen.

 Indeed the honey cake was a little burned on the top.  The rest tasted fine.

Then, I heard the voice of my mother Frugal Fran —– “YOU CAN’T THROW THAT OUT.  MAKE SOMETHING.”

So I went to the Internet.

“What to do when you burn the cake, slightly” I typed. Yes, I got a good answer.  Cut it off and use the cake bottom.

But how to use it?  I was panicking. The kitchen was getting too hot. (I also had forgotten to turn on the air conditioning.)  I suddenly was craving ice cream –my hot-weather comfort food.  Then, I remembered that a friend used to make ice cream cakes out of her leftover cakes.

Back to the Internet.  “Honey Ice Cream Cake”  NOTHING.

When searching on the Internet it is OK to start out specifically; however, you might have to simplify the search.

I had to be less specific just “Ice Cream Cake”.  Now, I had too much information, nothing of which was what I had in mind.

However, I was able to piece together ways of making an ice cream cake and getting it out of the pan without it falling into pieces. Plus, some ideas of various ingredients and how to combine them without melting the ice cream.

The Recipe for Honey Ice Cream Cake 

After putting all the information from the Internet together, I finally arrived at my recipe for Honey Ice Cream Cake or any other ice cream cake.

Obviously, this is not a picture of my Honey Ice Cream Cake.  With my guests waiting and my excitement that it came out of the pan OK and onto my servicing dish, I forgot to take a picture.

Nonetheless, you can see here that an ice cream cake is made up of a bottom cake, the middle ice cream with something dangerously delicious mixed into it and a decorous topping—all waiting for your own creativity.

Method

The biggest problem seems to be getting the cake out of the pan in a presentable form with no bits of foil or paper on the bottom of the cake. That doesn’t taste good and is embarrassing to the cook.  Here is what proved to be the best method that I found on the Internet.

Pan and Lining

1. Use a springform pan with a buckle on the side. Any size is fine.

2. Cover the bottom with strips of cling wrap or plastic wrap, whatever you call it. These strips must extend over the sides so that they can be used to cover the finished cake.

Note: The cling wrap  should extend somewhat farther from the edges than shown in this picture.

Freeze Solidly at Each Step.  You must plan to make this ice cream cake several days in advance.  To avoid any disasters, I suggest that. after each step, you allow at least a full day of freezing in the coldest part of the freezer.

Ingredients 

The Bottom.  

Not a picture of my actually cake.

I used the remains of a Honey Bourbon Cake from epicurious.com  Click on this link to get the recipe.

 (After removing the burnt top and checking on the taste–many times.)  I broke the remaining cake into large pieces and bushed them down solidly and evenly on the bottom of the prepared pan.  

I did not have to add anything to this bottom segment as the cake already had a distinctive taste.  

Put in the freezer for at least a day. Cover with the long pieces of cling wrap. 

You can substitute any cake, even leftovers and store-bought.  The flavor can be enhanced by adding something like fudge or butterscotch sauce or even slices of fresh fruit such as strawberries or peaches.

The Ice Cream.  

I used a middle-priced vanilla ice cream, which I froze hard when getting it home.

I also bought smaller Snicker Candy Bars that I also froze hard. I then was able to chop them easily into small bits that I returned to the freezer to again harden.

Next step is combining the ice cream and Snickers. 

Take the ice cream out of the freezer and put it into a chilled glass bowl. Using a silicone spatula, fold and stir the ice cream until it is slightly melted.  Take the Snickers from the freezer and add to the ice creams a small amount at a time.  But, to maintain a good texture, do not let the ice cream melt too much.  

Save some of the chopped Snickers to put on top of the cake.

Combining ice cream layer onto the cake. 

Remove the cake from the freezer and open up the cling wrap.

Quickly with the spatula evenly lift the ice cream mixture onto the cake and level.

Sprinkle the remaining Snickers on the cake and push gently and slightly into ice cream so that they will not fall off when you serve the cake.

Rewrap and cover the cake with another layer of cling wrap that seals down the sides.  Return to the freezer.

Remember you can use any kind of ice cream and additions.  You can make more than one layer.  Just remember to freeze solidly each layer before adding a new one.  Work rapidly so that they don’t melt.

To Plate and Serve.

Chill the service plate in the refrigerator until ready to plate the cake.

Take the cake from the freezer. Remove the buckle sides. Holding the cling wrapped solidly frozen cake lift from the pan and now place it on the plate. Gently remove the cling wrap.

The Topping

Because the flavours of the cake were already complex plus the Snickers, I chose to only drizzle a bit of plain honey around the top.

For other cakes you can go all out with hot fudge and butterscotch, cherries, miniature cookies—whatever your creative self can dream of.

The only problem is there will be no leftovers.

Great Recipe for Multitaskers

This is a great recipe for multitaskers because there are a lot of small steps with lots of time in between. Even if you forget something you can always improvise.  Just be sure to allow enough time and not to forget and leave the frozen things out to accidently melt!

So Frugal Fran, this is how you can use the Internet to make something out of your baking mistakes.

 

 

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